William Morris inspires Year 4

As part of our topic on the Victorians we have looked at the artist William Morris. We took his inspiration, which was nature, and tried to create our own repeating patterns.

At first we tried to draw our own repeating patterns but we did find it was tricky to make them match exactly.

 

Then we tried to paint our our individual patterns:

 

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We really enjoyed making our patterns and they looked very effective!

We discussed how we really had to concentrate to ensure that each repeat was identical to the one before. We looked at how printing machines were developed through the Victorian era and wondered if this would make a more consistent pattern. In order to try this out for ourselves we went onto Purple Mash to create our own designs.

Click on each of our names below to open a pdf of our designs:

Shayaan Mefin Nivas Aisha Peyton Chris Thuraya Charlie Rayaan Oliver B

This was a really interesting way of creating repeating patterns, we found it hard to choose our favourites.

We then wanted to make our own painted repeating patterns and we decided to use a tile to do this. We carved a picture into a polystyrene tile, rolled paint onto the tile and pressed it onto a large piece of paper. We continued this until we had covered our paper in the repeating pattern. This was a really fun lesson and here are our finished pieces of work, including a close up of each pattern.

 

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Thank you William Morris for your inspiration!

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Year 4 – Anti-bullying week

This week in school we took some time to consider that it was anti-bullying week.

We wanted to show our friends all of the good things that we thought about them. We wrote our name on a piece of paper and sent it round the circle, giving everyone a minute on each person’s paper to write. We wrote as many kind things that we could think of about our friends.

When we had our paper back it put a big smile on our faces to see what kind words were written about us. We will be taking our sheets home next week so ask us to tell you what our friends said!

A Victorian lesson at St Fagans – Years 3 and 4


Years 3 and 4 went to St Fagans for a Victorian school lesson. We were taught by Mr Evans who made us do handwriting, history, reading and recite our times tables. We all had to write with our right hand, even the children who normally use their left hand! We were surprised how different our lessons are to the Victorian lessons and we really felt like Victorian children.

Take a look at our Victorian lesson in the slideshow below:

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As part of the history lesson we had to recite a poem about the kings and queens of Britain. We tried really hard to speak clearly and recite it correctly:

 

Here is Nivas’ recount of our trip to the Victorian school:

On Friday we went to a Victorian school at St Fagans. We learned what Victorian schools were like. On the trip we went inside the building and if you talk or behave badly you will be caned. In the playground boys play on one side and girls the other side. In Victorian schools you must write with your right hand and if you speak Welsh you will wear a necklace and your job is to catch another person who speak Welsh and if you do you tell the teacher and they have to wear it and at the end of the class whoever has the necklace will be caned.

When we entered the room we were dressed as a Victorian school child. Victorian school children learnt handwriting, maths and reading poems and history. When a grownups enters the room all the children must stand and if you don’t you will be caned. If you write with your left you will get something to stop you writing with your left hand.

For lunch you will go home and when the teacher rings the bell that means you have ten minutes to get ready to come back to school and if your late you will get caned.The boys learned drawing and girls learned sewing and cooking. In Victorian schools you have to be five to start and 13 to end school. The bigger children sat at bigger desks and tiny children sat in tiny desks. Victorian teachers were very strict. We had to learn handwriting and you must not fidget or talk. Sometimes if you were very naughty and you would have to write lines 100 times or more. I thought it was very bad and I would not like to be a Victorian.